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Thursday, August 11, 2022

TramTrain For 2022 : Rail for the Valley

Renewed post from the beginning of the year.

With the devastation caused by this year’s heatwave, wildfires, tornadoes, atmospheric rivers, floods and of course our modern plague, Cubid, the county government must rethink its plans to spend more than $ 10 billion to build less than 22 miles of The light rail.

$ 10 billion you say? Yes, $ 10 billion and probably a little more.

  • The 5.8-mile (Broadway subway) mile to Arbutos is now set to cost over $ 3 billion.
  • The 16-mile Expo Line Langley now costs $ 4 billion.
  • The necessary mid-life detox for Expo (especially for) Expo and Millennium Lines may cost $ 3 billion.

In total, that’s more than $ 10 billion for a 21.8-mile line of just a light metro line. 21.8 miles of a new line will do very little to take cars off the road or reduce pollution, especially from vehicles and commercial vehicles.

There must be another way and there is, but our planners, engineers and especially our politicians remain deaf to a proven affordable alternative and it is TramTrain, a modern tram that can happily operate on both the tram and regular railway tracks.

The TramTrain can be built in the Fraser Valley for about $ 1.3 billion, connecting Vancouver to North Sari / Delta, Cloverdale, Langley, Abbotsford, Sardis / Vedar and Chillivac.

On Vancouver Island, TramTrain could be the answer for E&N. It is estimated that $ 1.5 billion may see a restored E&N offering a two-hour train service that serves the communities between Victoria and Courtney, and with greater investment there are tram / small train lines in Victoria and Naimu, which will attract even more customers to the crossing.

Global warming is real; Catastrophic weather events are becoming more common; Traffic loads are becoming endemic on both the mainland and Vancouver Island. The province needs real solutions to solve the growing climate crisis and the cycle of doing the same thing over and over again, and hoping for different results has long since ended.

We can not hide the terrain or ride a SkyTrain our way out of global warming, and yet that is what the current government is doing, as it transitions from a global warming fiasco to another.

We must convey a clear and concise message to all politicians, we must do much more with much less money.

TramTrain fits perfectly.

A Karlsruhe electric train on a cross-country railway in the Black Forest

December, 2020.

Membership orders in the light rail transportation association for over 35 years and with the membership comes a subscription to the most excellent magazine Tramways & Urban Transit.

The following will be the most interesting for those interested in connecting a reasonably priced train from Vancouver to Chilivac using the existing and former BC Electric passenger line connecting to Chilivac or returning the passenger service on the E&N train.

Today, six years after the publication of this article in T&UT, a lot has happened with TramTrain. There are currently more than 30 TramTrain systems operating worldwide, with another 30 plus systems planned.

TramTrain is evolving and with newer and greener propulsion systems and cheaper and safer signaling systems, TramTrain is no longer a niche transportation system, but a safe, cheap and user-friendly transportation mode that can expand its transportation system to lower population areas, provide efficient and cost-effective public transportation.

There are a number of candidates for the TramTrain service BC, and yet the county government and civilian politicians still want very expensive and economically devastating extensions to the current light metro system because they like to cut movies in front of mega-projects during elections.

It’s time to seriously consider TramTrain BC, but I’m afraid that with Horgan and the NDP, the cheap transit train has long since left the station.

Trams and urban transportation

Electric train / June 2014

www.tramnews.net.www.lrta.org

Electric train: a promise not fulfilled?

Teflin container

prologue

“On September 25, 1992, double-voltage LRVs began running between Karlsruhan and Bretten … Within a year the number of passengers had increased by 400%, and today the model works on almost 500 km (310 miles) of track.”

TramTrain and a regional passenger train at the station.

During 125 years of electric trams, the tram as we know it was usually developed as a vehicle suitable for alignments on or based on city streets. Of course there were intercity lines that crossed the country, especially in North America, where they reached their peak in 1915, before being extinct by the inevitable rise of motor vehicles. Some of them originated as steam tracks, and others entered cities on urban tram lines or high-speed transit lines. In Europe, and especially in Switzerland, such intercity trains were called light rail (to distinguish them from their main cousins), and again running to city streets was, and is quite common. The former NZH in the Netherlands is another example. Japan, with its plethora of private railroad companies, has followed the U.S. intercity pattern, though the boom there has coincided with the decline in North America, and Michael Teflin gives a brief overview of the electric train. More than technical concerns.

During 125 years of electric trams, the tram as we know it was usually developed as a vehicle suitable for alignments on or based on city streets. Of course there were intercity lines that crossed the country, especially in North America, where they reached their peak in 1915, before being extinct by the inevitable rise of motor vehicles. Some of them originated as steam tracks, and others entered cities on urban tram lines or high-speed transit lines. In Europe, and especially in Switzerland, such intercity trains were called light rail (to distinguish them from their main cousins), and again running to city streets was, and is quite common. The former NZH in the Netherlands is another example.

Japan, for its plethora of private railroad companies, has followed the intercity pattern in the U.S., though prosperity there has coincided with the decline in North America, and Michael Teflin gives a brief overview of the perception of the electric train and asks whether political and institutional issues create a greater barrier to further implementation Than technical problems.Most of the lines today survive as fast-moving operations, with some intrusion of city streets or subways.None of the above models have been called electric trains, although the principle is no different.

Germany The modern tram-train concept, inaugurated in Karlsruhe in Germany, uses an electric-based vehicle capable of operating on both the main railway tracks and the urban tram tracks. The sharing of tracks between trams and trains was not previously known, but the tracks involved could hardly be considered as a main line. Karlsruhe had its own intercity activity, the Albtalbahn, which in its northern arm had rail sharing with Deutsche Bahn (DB).

The possibility to travel to the city center without changing cars was very attractive for the passengers. Thanks to the German conception of the Verkehrsverbund common tariff area, the financial consequences could be detached from the commercial interests of the operators (AVG and DB), and the work concentrated on the legal and technical obstacles to be overcome in order to permit operation. On September 25, 1992, light-duty double-track trains (750V dc and 15 kV ac) began running between Karlsruhe and Barten, switching between urban tram lines and DB lines in Grötzingen.

Within a year the number of passengers had increased by 400%, and today the Karlsruhe model works on almost 500 km (310 miles) of track. Up to 45 more) .The electric train model was really a success, and a good deal for the consultants from Karlsruhe involved.

Other German examples followed, in Saarbrücken, Chemnitz, Zwickau, Kassel and Nordhausen, though not exact copies. Saarbrücken operates 28 Bombardier Flexity Linkdual voltage cars on the streets and then on DB tracks south of Sarreguemines,

To continue the story, please click here

After writing

If anyone wants to talk public transportation, join Light Rail Traffic Association

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